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  Whatever happened to...Quad Band Memory?
 
 

According to Kentron, QBM is not dead. In fact, they recently announced support for DDR400.

    Kentron Technologies has announced that its family of high performance QBM memory modules will support the DDRI-400 DRAM devices expected to become mainstream in the 2nd half of 2003.
So while DRAM manufacturers like Samsung, Micron, Hynix and Elpida focus their resources on improving bandwidth at the device level, Kentronā??s approach improves speed and density on the module or "platform" level using standard, "off-the-shelf" DRAM devices.
    By combining the low cost, QBM switch component and DDRI-400 devices, Kentron and its partners will deliver QBM800 modules that match the 800MHz front side bus of new system processors (CPUs) expected to be available in the 2nd half of 2003. The QBM800 modules will operate up to 6.4 GB/sec (single-channel) and 12.8 GB/sec (dual-channel) and will be positioned as the lowest cost and highest performance memory modules in the industry. Kentron and its channel partners will be introducing QBM533 (4.2 GB/sec) modules using DDRI-266 memory devices in Q1 of 2003.

What products will be able to take advantage of QDM? It appears that the new P4X800 chipsets from VIA Technologies, Inc. may be the first.

The QBM533 modules combined with the VIA P4X800 memory controllers will match the fast 533MHz front side bus of CPUs and provide the highest performance single channel solution in the system marketplace. As the CPUs move to the faster 667MHz and 800MHz front side bus, Kentron will be providing QBM based solutions to meet those speeds using available low cost DDRI-333 and DDRI-400 memory devices.
QBM-800 Modules based on DDRI-400 devices won't be available until the second half of 2003. By that time, DDR-II may be gaining popularity. Hopefully, QDM won't go down in history as a good idea, that was too late too market.

Previous Page    
Table of Contents
Page 1: What is Quad Band Memory?
Page 2: The Future of Quad Band Memory

 
      Posted by: , December 26, 2002, 6:00 pm  

 
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